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CANCELED: The Economy of Pope Francis

Mar 26, 2020
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Peter SchallenbergKatholische Sozialwissenschaftliche Zentralstelle

Nils GoldschmidtUniversity of Siegen

Joseph KaboskiUniversity of Notre Dame

Due to restrictions put in place in response to the spread of COVID-19, this event has been postponed. We look forward to scheduling similar programming in the future.


Does this “economy kill?” Pope Francis denounces “throw-away cultures” and “economies of exclusion and inequality.” Does Pope Francis’s thought on the economy reduce to a Jeremiad? How does his economic vision align with or diverge from the teachings of recent other popes on the economy? How might his critiques be compatible with or improve upon a free-market economy and work towards greater human flourishing? Join for a discussion between international economists and a moral theologian on Pope Francis’s economic vision and what a response to his critique of our “throwaway culture” looks like in practice on an individual, communal, and global scale?

Msgr. Peter Schallenberg is Chair of Moral Theology and Ethics at the Universität Paderborn in Germany and director of the Katholische Sozialwissenschaftliche Zentralstelle (KSZ), or the Catholic Social Science Social Center, in Mönchengladbach, Germany. He also acts as an advisor to the Vatican’s Dicastery for the Integral Development of Man on questions of economics and social ethics. Msgr. Schallenberg studied at the Collegium Germanicum et Hungaricum and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He completed his habilitation in moral theology at the University of Münster. He has been a visiting professor at the Pontificio Istituto “Giovanni Paolo II” of the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome and at the Theological College Alba Julia in Transylvania. He is director of the Catholic Social Science Central Office in Mönchengladbach, a member of the German Caritas Association’s Commission on Social Policy and Society, conventual chaplain of the Sovereign Order of Malta, and serves on the Spiritual Advisory Board of the Federal Association of Catholics in Business and Administration (KKV) on behalf of the German Bishops’ Conference.


Prof. Dr. Nils Goldschmidt is Professor of Contextual Economics and Economic Education at the Center for Economic Education at the University of Siegen and is chairman of the Social Market Economy Association in Tübingen. Dr. Goldschmidt completed his undergraduate education at Albert Ludwig University in Freiburg receiving diplomas in theology and economics. He was awarded his doctorate in Economics in 2001, and his Habilitation in Economics in 2008, both from the Albert Ludwig University, in Friburg. He has taught at the University of the Bundeswehr in Munich, the Munich University of Politics, the Catholic University Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, and at the Munich University of Applied Sciences. Since 2013, he has been Professor of Contextual Economics and Economic Education at the University of Siegen, and since 2015 has acted as director of its center for teacher education and educational research. Dr. Goldschmidt is on the board of directors for the International Research Area on Catholic Social Doctrine, Pontifical Lateran University, Rome and was appointed in 2012 to the Working Group on Social Policy Issues of the Commission for Social and Social Issues at the German Bishops' Conference.


Joseph Kaboski is the David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame. He holds a PhD from the University of Chicago. Kaboski's research focuses on growth, development, and international economics. In 2012, he was awarded the prestigious Frisch Medal for the best paper in the journal Econometrica and has published scholarly articles in many other journals, including the American Economic Review and The Journal of Economic Theory. He is the president of CREDO, a past consultant to Catholic Relief Services, and is currently a Consultant to the USCCB, Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development.